New Orleans Is A Gift To The World

David Simon is one of the best series writers in the world. The American likes to put entire cities at the centre of his epics. In Treme, the showrunner presented New Orleans as America’s gift to the world. The title comes from a district, namely Faubourg Treme. For David Simon, it is the heart of the city and, at the same time, the core of his story. After all, this small part of New Orleans was where jazz was initially born. In the former Congo Square, which is now part of Armstrong Park, the slaves of the Creole plantation owners made music and invented the music style that still shapes the world today. Jazz, blues and hip-hop originated here.

New Orleans Is A Gift To The World
New Orleans Is A Gift To The World

The author had to fight for his idea for a long time. After all, the TV series is anything but mass-produced. Simon wanted to show which part of the culture was lost by the storm Katrina and how hard the residents had to fight for their city. Therefore, as in The Wire, he relies on portraits of numerous people. Musicians, club owners and restaurant operators find each other united in their pain and bring their destroyed city back to life. Here the unemployed stand side by side with the university professor and fights for his old life.

A Puzzle Of Fates Gives An Overall Picture

In the course of the series, all of these fates interlock to form a larger whole. In this panopticon, a whole city is fighting against its downfall. The small and personal stories of the protagonists are what makes Treme so attractive. But the showrunner takes a look away from the tourist hotspots of New Orleans. Mardi Gras or Bourbon Street are not the focus of the action here, but the people behind the scenes of the city.

Simon has always made television a prey, not a lean back. He focuses his stories on complex materials that have their roots in the social reality of the residents. There are no heroes and villains here; you can not divide something into black or white. Treme seems difficult to the mainstream consumer. Before his career, which began with the pay-TV broadcaster HBO, David Simon was a police reporter. His book Homicide was once the basis for the highly successful series of the same name on NBC.

A Puzzle Of Fates Gives An Overall Picture
A Puzzle Of Fates Gives An Overall Picture

When he was frustrated, Simon turned his back on journalism but has now found the ideal medium for his complex stories on television. He does not look first and foremost at the individual but tries to analyze the complex relationships between people and institutions. The author finds his role models in the Greek playwrights, whose approach serves as a model. It’s not for nothing that critics consider David Simon’s shows to be the best television has ever produced. Treme provides further evidence of this. In three seasons, Simon erects a memorial to the residents of the badly battered city.